For Acharya's Main Website, go to
TruthBeKnown.com

TBK News Table of Contents

Bookmark and Share
Join the TBK Mailing List!
Enter your name and email address below to receive news and cutting edge commentary from Acharya!

Name:
Email:
Subscribe  Unsubscribe 

Tuesday, April 07, 2009

Jesus in India?

With the creation of a new movie, there is increased interest in the old tale that Jesus Christ traveled to India, where he lived to a ripe old age.

While this story may be fascinating, when examined scientifically it fails to hold water. This legend has been spread in recent years largely by an Islamic sect that wishes to claim the hereditary inheritance of the famed Jewish godman.

For more information about this story, as well as the equally implausible tale about Jesus having been in Great Britain, see my essay:

Jesus in India? The Myth of the Lost Years

As has been demonstrated repeatedly in scientific and scholarly books on the subject, the character called "Jesus Christ" is a mythical entity based on other mythical figures dating back into the hoary mists of time.

The fact of Christianity essentially representing a contrived rehash of sun worship is clearly shown in my latest book Christ in Egypt: The Horus-Jesus Connection.

The "lost years" of Jesus are in fact atrotheological, representing part of solar mythology. In the story of the sun god, the solar hero is a "child teacher" at the "age" of 12 noon, when he reaches the "temple" of his "father" - Re or Ra in the Egyptian myth. When the sun transits from one month of the 360-day year or 1/12th or the zodiacal circle, he attains the age of 28 or 30. And here was have the 18 "lost years."

Fortunately, there are those who have actually studied the subject, read my work and who realize that by denying the facts presented therein we are robbing the world of the real history of religious ideology and mythology.

7 comments:

Arhata Osho said...

More Hogwash!

I bought into it in 1989 from a book by a German author who said the tomb was in Srinagar, Kashmir largely populated by Muslims. It motivated me to travel to India (which I'm thankful for) and the "tomb" felt to be a scam by "wannabees" for attention.

Also, I took a trip to the edge of the Himalayas to see the alleged tomb of Moses whose tomb had been purportedly guarded by a succession of "holy men" since before "Christ."

In the book that I used as a guide was a picture of the "holy man" currently in charge - he was
there! Showed him the picture of himself - he had never seen it before and...the whole thing looked bogus! Shortly after that, a friend began researching the whole business and, the rest is history.

Happy Easter Bunny and Spring Soltice!

Acharya S said...

Good golly! I remember that trip of yours. I was so amazed, because you'd never left the U.S. before - you'd never been in a place where English was not the main language.

And what a place to go! I recall you telling me about the lights going out every night to save electricity. Such a beautiful site, Kashmir, and so torn up by religious fanaticism.

Thanks so much for posting your opinions about this apparent product of priestcraft. I imagine it's fairly old, as in centuries, but not dating to the alleged time of JC.

JewWatchskullnboner said...

I envy Arhata's trip to Kashmir, but what a naive dude he must have been! lmao!

It was a good fantasy read anyway and it's not a bad thing to be adventuresome, learn about new cultures and sites of a foreign country. As well the human weakness for telling tall tales. Okay, I got one more place for Arhata to visit just to make sure...hee hee!

Senador Lombrith said...

Dear Acharya,

I read last summer your book "The Christ Conspiracy" and I found your statements both sensible and documented. Since then, I have wanted to congratulate you about it.

Since then, also, there is a question that strikes me from time to time:

Given that a 24 hour day is needed in order to have a "12-years-old child" at noon, do you know what brought the ancient peoples to decide that the hours should begin at midnight and not, for example, at dawn? Was it maybe more important the noon-time than the daybreak as a point of reference?

Thank you,

Jordi

Acharya S said...

Given that a 24 hour day is needed in order to have a "12-years-old child" at noon, do you know what brought the ancient peoples to decide that the hours should begin at midnight and not, for example, at dawn? Was it maybe more important the noon-time than the daybreak as a point of reference?

Thank you,

Jordi
Thank you for the kind words and kudos. That is a great question, and I don't know the answer to it off hand. I would have to do some research.

Thanks for the food for thought.

ad said...

Dawn and sunset change with the seasons and so don't make very good reference points. Midnight however is easily measured as the mid-point between successive sunset and sunrise, and is a constant. I think it would be inconvenient if a new day started at midday, better to get it over with while your sleeping.

Aleph-Bayt said...

Some interesting ideas here. Do you read hebrew ? Do you know the Alpeh-Bayt ?